Kiel Life Science

News

aktuelles

A variety of both scientific and also outreach activities and events are organized each year by KLS. A public lecture series features distinguished international researchers from various fields of life sciences and is held at Kiel University each term. Find out more about news and events from KLS:

KLS news & events:

Angela Douglas honoured with Karl August Möbius Fellowship 2017

Jul 06, 2017

Kiel Collaborative Research Centre opens metaorganism art exhibition to celebrate the award evening 

Yesterday, Tuesday 2 May, the Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1182 "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms” at Kiel University awarded the newly-created science prize the "Karl August Möbius Fellowship” for the first time. The 10,000 euro prize went to Professor Angela Douglas of Cornell University in the USA, to honour her accomplishments in studying the symbiotic relationship between organisms and microorganisms. Douglas, who is regarded as one of the pioneers in this still-young scientific field, opened on this occasion - together with the CRC - the exhibition "Art of Metaorganisms" at the Centre for Molecular Biosciences (ZMB) at Kiel University. Using impressive pictures, the show conveys the inter-relationships between animals, plants and bacteria, and thus makes the abstract topic of metaorganism research also accessible to non-experts. From today onwards, visitors can see the exhibition from Mondays to Thursdays from 7:30am to 4pm and on Fridays from 8am to 2pm in the foyer of the ZMB.

The prize winner Douglas is professor of physiology and toxicology of insects, and investigates the relationship between microbes and higher life forms at Cornell University. Based on the study of these interactions, she seeks to derive biomedical models, to make the positive impact of bacteria on the health of humans and animals usable. The internationally-renowned scientist is a worthy first winner of this new Kiel science prize, with which the CRC 1182 aims to emphasise the importance of metaorganism research, also on an international level. 

"Angela Douglas plays an exceptional role in the new scientific field of metaorganism research. We are proud to honour her as the first prize winner of the Karl August Möbius Fellowship of our Collaborative Research Centre, and furthermore to cooperate closely with her scientifically," emphasised Professor Thomas Bosch, spokesperson of the CRC 1182. Douglas is a regular guest at Kiel University, and recently spent several weeks researching in Kiel as part of the "Karl August Möbius Fellowship", in order to exchange ideas and information with the CRC scientists. 

Naming the prize after Karl August Möbius is a well-considered choice: in the second half of the 19th century in Kiel, the zoologist and ecologist discovered the concept of biocoenosis - the mutual dependency of different organisms within an integrated community. The current metaorganism researchers in Kiel, and their partners around the world, continue this direction of research initiated by Möbius, by further developing the concept of multi-organismic relationships, and its impact on the health and diseases of humans, animals and plants. 

With the "Art of Metaorganisms" exhibition, featuring contributions from researchers of the CRC 1182 as well as international scientists, Douglas and her colleagues from Kiel want to convey their topic to the public through an artistic interpretation. The interaction of the body and microorganisms becomes tangible via aesthetic and expressive images - even for visitors with no knowledge of the subject. The organising team hopes that the exhibition will help us to understand bacteria as an indispensable support for the health and well-being of the human body. This is just one of a number of formats through which the CRC 1182 researchers aim to interface between science and the public.

About the CRC 1182
The Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1182 "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms" is working on the issue of how plants and animals, including humans, form functional units (metaorganisms) together with highly specific microbial communities. The aim of the CRC is to understand why and how microbial communities enter into these long lasting connections with their hosts, and what functional consequences these interactions have. In total, CRC 1182 includes around 70 scientists from five faculties at Kiel University, from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the Max Planck Institutes for Evolutionary Biology in Plön and for Marine Microbiology in Bremen.

Photos are available to download:
1. www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-136-1.jpg 
Professor Angela Douglas of Cornell University is the first recipient of the new Kiel science award „Karl August Möbius-Fellowship“. To the left: Professor Thomas Bosch, CRC1182-speaker.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

2. www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-136-2.jpg 
Angela Douglas was honoured for her outstanding achievements in the scientific field of host-microbe interactions.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

3. www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-136-3.jpg 
Douglas’ “Möbius-Fellowship Lecture” was part of the prizegiving ceremony on Tuesday evening at Kiel University. 
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

4. www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-136-4.jpg 
Later that evening, Douglas and Bosch opened the new „Art of Metaorganisms“-exhibition in the foyer of Kiel University’s Center for Molecular Biosciences.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

5. www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-136-5.jpg 
The exhibition’s pictures convey impressions of the research into the interactions between animals, plants and bacteria. 
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

Contact:
Prof. Thomas Bosch, 
Zoological Institute, Kiel University
Tel.: 0431-880-4170
E-mail: tbosch@zoologie.uni-kiel.de

More information:
Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1182 "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms", Kiel University:
www.metaorganism-research.com

Douglas Lab, Department of Molecular Biology & Genetics, Cornell University
angeladouglaslab.com/


Kiel University
Press, Communication and Marketing, Dr Boris Pawlowski, Text: Christian Urban 
Postal address: D-24098 Kiel, Germany, 
Telephone: +49 (0)431 880-2104, Fax: +49 (0)431 880-1355
E-mail: presse@uv.uni-kiel.de, Internet: www.uni-kiel.de, Twitter: www.twitter.com/kieluni 
Facebook: www.facebook.com/kieluni, Instagram: www.instagram.com/kieluni

Angela Douglas honoured with Karl August Möbius Fellowship 2017

May 03, 2017

Kiel Collaborative Research Centre opens metaorganism art exhibition to celebrate the award evening 

Yesterday, Tuesday 2 May, the Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1182 "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms” at Kiel University awarded the newly-created science prize the "Karl August Möbius Fellowship” for the first time. The 10,000 euro prize went to Professor Angela Douglas of Cornell University in the USA, to honour her accomplishments in studying the symbiotic relationship between organisms and microorganisms. Douglas, who is regarded as one of the pioneers in this still-young scientific field, opened on this occasion - together with the CRC - the exhibition "Art of Metaorganisms" at the Centre for Molecular Biosciences (ZMB) at Kiel University. Using impressive pictures, the show conveys the inter-relationships between animals, plants and bacteria, and thus makes the abstract topic of metaorganism research also accessible to non-experts. From today onwards, visitors can see the exhibition from Mondays to Thursdays from 7:30am to 4pm and on Fridays from 8am to 2pm in the foyer of the ZMB.

The prize winner Douglas is professor of physiology and toxicology of insects, and investigates the relationship between microbes and higher life forms at Cornell University. Based on the study of these interactions, she seeks to derive biomedical models, to make the positive impact of bacteria on the health of humans and animals usable. The internationally-renowned scientist is a worthy first winner of this new Kiel science prize, with which the CRC 1182 aims to emphasise the importance of metaorganism research, also on an international level. 

"Angela Douglas plays an exceptional role in the new scientific field of metaorganism research. We are proud to honour her as the first prize winner of the Karl August Möbius Fellowship of our Collaborative Research Centre, and furthermore to cooperate closely with her scientifically," emphasised Professor Thomas Bosch, spokesperson of the CRC 1182. Douglas is a regular guest at Kiel University, and recently spent several weeks researching in Kiel as part of the "Karl August Möbius Fellowship", in order to exchange ideas and information with the CRC scientists. 

Naming the prize after Karl August Möbius is a well-considered choice: in the second half of the 19th century in Kiel, the zoologist and ecologist discovered the concept of biocoenosis - the mutual dependency of different organisms within an integrated community. The current metaorganism researchers in Kiel, and their partners around the world, continue this direction of research initiated by Möbius, by further developing the concept of multi-organismic relationships, and its impact on the health and diseases of humans, animals and plants. 

With the "Art of Metaorganisms" exhibition, featuring contributions from researchers of the CRC 1182 as well as international scientists, Douglas and her colleagues from Kiel want to convey their topic to the public through an artistic interpretation. The interaction of the body and microorganisms becomes tangible via aesthetic and expressive images - even for visitors with no knowledge of the subject. The organising team hopes that the exhibition will help us to understand bacteria as an indispensable support for the health and well-being of the human body. This is just one of a number of formats through which the CRC 1182 researchers aim to interface between science and the public.

About the CRC 1182
The Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1182 "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms" is working on the issue of how plants and animals, including humans, form functional units (metaorganisms) together with highly specific microbial communities. The aim of the CRC is to understand why and how microbial communities enter into these long lasting connections with their hosts, and what functional consequences these interactions have. In total, CRC 1182 includes around 70 scientists from five faculties at Kiel University, from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the Max Planck Institutes for Evolutionary Biology in Plön and for Marine Microbiology in Bremen.

Photos are available to download:
1. www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-136-1.jpg 
Professor Angela Douglas of Cornell University is the first recipient of the new Kiel science award „Karl August Möbius-Fellowship“. To the left: Professor Thomas Bosch, CRC1182-speaker.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

2. www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-136-2.jpg 
Angela Douglas was honoured for her outstanding achievements in the scientific field of host-microbe interactions.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

3. www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-136-3.jpg 
Douglas’ “Möbius-Fellowship Lecture” was part of the prizegiving ceremony on Tuesday evening at Kiel University. 
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

4. www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-136-4.jpg 
Later that evening, Douglas and Bosch opened the new „Art of Metaorganisms“-exhibition in the foyer of Kiel University’s Center for Molecular Biosciences.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

5. www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-136-5.jpg 
The exhibition’s pictures convey impressions of the research into the interactions between animals, plants and bacteria. 
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

Contact:
Prof. Thomas Bosch, 
Zoological Institute, Kiel University
Tel.: 0431-880-4170
E-mail: tbosch@zoologie.uni-kiel.de

More information:
Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1182 "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms", Kiel University:
www.metaorganism-research.com

Douglas Lab, Department of Molecular Biology & Genetics, Cornell University
angeladouglaslab.com/


Kiel University
Press, Communication and Marketing, Dr Boris Pawlowski, Text: Christian Urban 
Postal address: D-24098 Kiel, Germany, 
Telephone: +49 (0)431 880-2104, Fax: +49 (0)431 880-1355
E-mail: presse@uv.uni-kiel.de, Internet: www.uni-kiel.de, Twitter: www.twitter.com/kieluni 
Facebook: www.facebook.com/kieluni, Instagram: www.instagram.com/kieluni

Kiel Evolutionary Research at the Hannover Messe 2017

Apr 26, 2017

Kiel researchers present their concept of "Translational Evolutionary Research"

The Hannover Messe started today, Monday 24 April, in the capital of Lower Saxony. For the first time, Kiel University (CAU) is also represented with its own booth in Hall 2, "Research & Technology": from now until 28 April, the CAU will present its four research focus areas. At the start of the trade fair on Monday 24 April, the "Kiel Life Science" (KLS) focus area presented the "Kiel Evolution Center" (KEC) at the CAU booth. KEC experts introduced Kiel's concept of "Translational Evolutionary Research to Solve Social Problems". Dr Olivia Roth (GEOMAR) and Professor Hinrich Schulenburg (CAU) discussed with the audience and the host Jan-Martin Wiarda, science journalist from Berlin, the potential application of evolutionary principles in health, the environment and agriculture.

They explained that, for example, the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the overuse of dwindling fish stocks, or harvest losses due to plant pests, can have a common cause: through its actions, mankind interferes in natural selection and thus influences evolutionary processes. These actions often result in highly-negative long-term consequences, which the Kiel researchers want to counter by specifically moving evolutionary processes into the focus. "Evolution is a main contributor to the current problems, but is only rarely taken into account in the development of new measures. We want to change that, because this is the only way we can find sustainable solutions," emphasised Professor Hinrich Schulenburg, spokesperson of the "Kiel Evolution Center" in Hanover.

In addition to this presentation, the KEC also co-designed the trade fair booth of the life science research focus: the social relevance of translational evolutionary research is explained using descriptive examples from the fields of medicine, agriculture and the environment. In addition, KEC experts were on site to answer visitors’ questions, and raised awareness of their research approach and the science location Kiel as a nationally-unique focal point in evolutionary research.

The exhibits of the research focus "Kiel Life Science" can be seen throughout the whole week of the fair. Here you can find the complete programme of Kiel’s presentations at the Hannover Messe from 24 to 28 April 2017:

www.uni-kiel.de/hannovermesse
www.hannovermesse.de/aussteller/christian-albrechts-universitaet-zu-kiel/P412512

Kiel University’s booth can be found in Hall 2, C07
https://www.uni-kiel.de/hannovermesse/de/hallenplan


About the KEC:
Kiel Evolution Center (KEC) is an interactive platform at Kiel University that aims to better coordinate evolutionary researchers in Kiel and surroundings. Furthermore, under the key term of "Translational Evolutionary Research", specific bridges should be built between fundamental research and practical applications. Alongside the promotion of science, the focus of the "Kiel Evolution Center” also expressly includes teaching and public relations work. In addition to Kiel University, there are researchers involved from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön (MPI EB) and the Research Center Borstel (FZB), Leibniz Center for Medicine and Biosciences.

Photos are available for download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-121-1.jpg
Caption: At the start of the trade fair the "Kiel Evolution Center" presented the concept of "Translational Evolutionary Research".
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-121-1.jpg
Caption: Dr Olivia Roth (GEOMAR) and Professor Hinrich Schulenburg (CAU) discussed the potential application of evolutionary principles with the audience and the host Jan-Martin Wiarda.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-121-3.jpg
Caption: Dr. Olivia Roth (GEOMAR) gave a talk about the convergent evolution of male and female pregnancy.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-121-4.jpg
Caption: Professor Hinrich Schulenburg (CAU) explained how evolutionary research could help to overcome the antibiotics crisis in the future.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

Contact:
Prof. Hinrich Schulenburg
Spokesperson “Kiel Evolution Center” (KEC), Kiel University
Tel.: +49 (0)431-880-4141
E-mail: hschulenburg@zoologie.uni-kiel.de

More information:
Research centre “Kiel Evolution Center”, Kiel University:
www.kec.uni-kiel.de

Research focus "Kiel Life Science“, CAU Kiel:
www.kls.uni-kiel.de
 

Kiel Evolutionary Research at the Hannover Messe 2017

Jul 06, 2017

Kiel researchers present their concept of "Translational Evolutionary Research"

The Hannover Messe started today, Monday 24 April, in the capital of Lower Saxony. For the first time, Kiel University (CAU) is also represented with its own booth in Hall 2, "Research & Technology": from now until 28 April, the CAU will present its four research focus areas. At the start of the trade fair on Monday 24 April, the "Kiel Life Science" (KLS) focus area presented the "Kiel Evolution Center" (KEC) at the CAU booth. KEC experts introduced Kiel's concept of "Translational Evolutionary Research to Solve Social Problems". Dr Olivia Roth (GEOMAR) and Professor Hinrich Schulenburg (CAU) discussed with the audience and the host Jan-Martin Wiarda, science journalist from Berlin, the potential application of evolutionary principles in health, the environment and agriculture.

They explained that, for example, the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the overuse of dwindling fish stocks, or harvest losses due to plant pests, can have a common cause: through its actions, mankind interferes in natural selection and thus influences evolutionary processes. These actions often result in highly-negative long-term consequences, which the Kiel researchers want to counter by specifically moving evolutionary processes into the focus. "Evolution is a main contributor to the current problems, but is only rarely taken into account in the development of new measures. We want to change that, because this is the only way we can find sustainable solutions," emphasised Professor Hinrich Schulenburg, spokesperson of the "Kiel Evolution Center" in Hanover.

In addition to this presentation, the KEC also co-designed the trade fair booth of the life science research focus: the social relevance of translational evolutionary research is explained using descriptive examples from the fields of medicine, agriculture and the environment. In addition, KEC experts were on site to answer visitors’ questions, and raised awareness of their research approach and the science location Kiel as a nationally-unique focal point in evolutionary research.

The exhibits of the research focus "Kiel Life Science" can be seen throughout the whole week of the fair. Here you can find the complete programme of Kiel’s presentations at the Hannover Messe from 24 to 28 April 2017:

www.uni-kiel.de/hannovermesse
www.hannovermesse.de/aussteller/christian-albrechts-universitaet-zu-kiel/P412512

Kiel University’s booth can be found in Hall 2, C07
https://www.uni-kiel.de/hannovermesse/de/hallenplan


About the KEC:
Kiel Evolution Center (KEC) is an interactive platform at Kiel University that aims to better coordinate evolutionary researchers in Kiel and surroundings. Furthermore, under the key term of "Translational Evolutionary Research", specific bridges should be built between fundamental research and practical applications. Alongside the promotion of science, the focus of the "Kiel Evolution Center” also expressly includes teaching and public relations work. In addition to Kiel University, there are researchers involved from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön (MPI EB) and the Research Center Borstel (FZB), Leibniz Center for Medicine and Biosciences.

Es stehen Fotos/Materialien zum Download bereit:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-121-1.jpg
Caption: At the start of the trade fair the "Kiel Evolution Center" presented the concept of "Translational Evolutionary Research".
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-121-2.jpg
Caption: Dr Olivia Roth (GEOMAR) and Professor Hinrich Schulenburg (CAU) discussed the potential application of evolutionary principles with the audience and the host Jan-Martin Wiarda.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-121-3.jpg
Caption: Dr. Olivia Roth (GEOMAR) gave a talk about the convergent evolution of male and female pregnancy.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-121-4.jpg
Caption: Professor Hinrich Schulenburg (CAU) explained how evolutionary research could help to overcome the antibiotics crisis in the future.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

Contact:
Prof. Hinrich Schulenburg
Spokesperson “Kiel Evolution Center” (KEC), Kiel University
Tel.: +49 (0)431-880-4141
E-mail: hschulenburg@zoologie.uni-kiel.de

More information:
Research centre “Kiel Evolution Center”, Kiel University:

www.kec.uni-kiel.de

Research focus "Kiel Life Science“, CAU Kiel:
www.kls.uni-kiel.de

Kiel Life Science at the Hannover Messe 2017

Apr 21, 2017

Kiel Life Science presents cutting-edge life science research at the world’s largest industrial trade fair

When the Hannover Messe opens next Monday, 24 April in the capital of Lower Saxony, Kiel University (CAU) will enter new territory with its appearance at the fair: for the first time, the four CAU research focus areas of life science, nano, surface and interface science, marine science and cultural change will present themselves to the public at the largest industrial fair in the world. The "Kiel Life Science" (KLS) research focus, with its attractive programme of exhibits and presentations, will help to showcase cutting-edge research from Kiel, and its interfaces with society and applications.

KLS spokesperson Professor Thomas Bosch emphasised: "The aim of our research is to understand the origin of healthy and diseased processes in various organisms, in interaction with their environment. Thereby we hope to derive new options for prophylaxis and treatment in future. In Hanover, we want to present how our highly interdisciplinary research will help to solve the fundamental problems in health, environment and nutrition in the future."

As representatives of life science in Kiel, experts from the "Kiel Evolution Center" (KEC) will host a discussion at the beginning of the CAU trade fair appearance in Hall 2, "Research & Technology": on Monday at 10am and again at 12 noon, under the title "Translational Evolutionary Research to Solve Social Problems", Dr Olivia Roth (GEOMAR) and Professor Hinrich Schulenburg (CAU) will explain how the research and application of evolutionary principles can help to fight the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, or the overuse of dwindling fish stocks.

Overall, by means of various dialogue events and exhibits, “Kiel Life Science” will present exemplary insights into the various areas of cutting-edge life science research at the Schleswig-Holstein state university.
This includes, amongst others, the exhibition "Perspective Microbiome", which highlights the importance of research into microbial colonisation of the human body: the objective behind the bacteria self-tests - developed by students of Muthesius University together with the Cluster of Excellence “Inflammation at Interfaces” - is to use diagnostics of microorganisms in the human body to enable individualised medical treatment in future. In addition, the prototype of a new mobile medical app will be presented in “eHealth App: record up-to-the-minute health status by smartphone". In future, this smartphone application will record medical data in the everyday life of patients, and thus targets the development of more accurate treatment approaches for various serious diseases.

The following representative key topics will be presented by the research focus area at the Hannover Messe: transferring research results from bench to bedsite, researching the human microbiome in health and disease, and the influence of evolutionary processes on the environment and health. The focus here is on personalised medicine, the objective of which is to optimise healthcare to match the individual status and needs of the patients. Overall, the Kiel life scientists hope to offer diverse insights into their excellent research, and thereby to be able to highlight the importance of cutting-edge research for society and innovation.

Here you can find the complete programme of Kiel’s presentations at the Hannover Messe from 24 to 28 April 2017:
www.uni-kiel.de/hannovermesse

www.hannovermesse.de/aussteller/christian-albrechts-universitaet-zu-kiel

Kiel University’s booth can be found in Hall 2, C07
www.uni-kiel.de/hannovermesse/de/hallenplan

About Kiel Life Science:
The interdisciplinary centre for applied life sciences – Kiel Life Science (KLS) – links research at the CAU from the fields of agricultural and nutritional sciences, the natural sciences and medicine. It forms one of four research focus areas at Kiel University, and is aimed at achieving a better understanding of the cellular and molecular processes with which organisms respond to environmental influences. The research is focussed on issues such as how agricultural crop plants adapt to specific growth conditions, or how illnesses can arise through the interaction of genes, individual lifestyle and environmental factors. Health is always viewed holistically in the context of evolution. Under the research focus’ name, there are currently around 80 scientists from 40 institutes and six faculties from Kiel University working collaboratively as full members.

Photos/material is available for download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-118-1.jpg
Caption: A digital interactive presentation of KLS key research topics is part of the booth at the Hannover Messe.
Graphics: KLS, Kiel University

www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-118-2.jpg
Caption: One of the exhibits at Hannover: The self-test „Perspective microbiome“ enables the diagnosis of micro-organisms in the human body.
Copyright: Yannick Kaiser/studioungleich.de

Contact:
Prof. Thomas Bosch
Zoological Institute, Kiel University
Tel.: 0431-880-4170
E-mail: tbosch@zoologie.uni-kiel.de

More information:
Research focus “Kiel Life Science”, Kiel University
www.kls.uni-kiel.de/en

Kiel Evolution Center, Kiel University
www.kec.uni-kiel.de

Cluster of Excellence "Inflammation at Interfaces":
inflammation-at-interfaces.de

Kiel University
Press, Communication and Marketing, Dr. Boris Pawlowski
Address: D-24098 Kiel, phone: +49 (0431) 880-2104, fax: +49 (0431) 880-1355
E-Mail: ► presse@uv.uni-kiel.de, Internet: ► www.uni-kiel.de
Twitter: ► www.twitter.com/kieluni, Facebook: ► www.facebook.com/kieluni, Instagram: ► www.instagram.com/kieluni
Text / Redaktion: ► Christian Urban

 

Kiel Life Science at the Hannover Messe 2017

Jul 06, 2017

Kiel Life Science presents cutting-edge life science research at the world’s largest industrial trade fair

When the Hannover Messe opens next Monday, 24 April in the capital of Lower Saxony, Kiel University (CAU) will enter new territory with its appearance at the fair: for the first time, the four CAU research focus areas of life science, nano, surface and interface science, marine science and cultural change will present themselves to the public at the largest industrial fair in the world. The "Kiel Life Science" (KLS) research focus, with its attractive programme of exhibits and presentations, will help to showcase cutting-edge research from Kiel, and its interfaces with society and applications.

KLS spokesperson Professor Thomas Bosch emphasised: "The aim of our research is to understand the origin of healthy and diseased processes in various organisms, in interaction with their environment. Thereby we hope to derive new options for prophylaxis and treatment in future. In Hanover, we want to present how our highly interdisciplinary research will help to solve the fundamental problems in health, environment and nutrition in the future."

As representatives of life science in Kiel, experts from the "Kiel Evolution Center" (KEC) will host a discussion at the beginning of the CAU trade fair appearance in Hall 2, "Research & Technology": on Monday at 10am and again at 12 noon, under the title "Translational Evolutionary Research to Solve Social Problems", Dr Olivia Roth (GEOMAR) and Professor Hinrich Schulenburg (CAU) will explain how the research and application of evolutionary principles can help to fight the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, or the overuse of dwindling fish stocks.

Overall, by means of various dialogue events and exhibits, “Kiel Life Science” will present exemplary insights into the various areas of cutting-edge life science research at the Schleswig-Holstein state university.
This includes, amongst others, the exhibition "Perspective Microbiome", which highlights the importance of research into microbial colonisation of the human body: the objective behind the bacteria self-tests - developed by students of Muthesius University together with the Cluster of Excellence “Inflammation at Interfaces” - is to use diagnostics of microorganisms in the human body to enable individualised medical treatment in future. In addition, the prototype of a new mobile medical app will be presented in “eHealth App: record up-to-the-minute health status by smartphone". In future, this smartphone application will record medical data in the everyday life of patients, and thus targets the development of more accurate treatment approaches for various serious diseases.

The following representative key topics will be presented by the research focus area at the Hannover Messe: transferring research results from bench to bedsite, researching the human microbiome in health and disease, and the influence of evolutionary processes on the environment and health. The focus here is on personalised medicine, the objective of which is to optimise healthcare to match the individual status and needs of the patients. Overall, the Kiel life scientists hope to offer diverse insights into their excellent research, and thereby to be able to highlight the importance of cutting-edge research for society and innovation.

Here you can find the complete programme of Kiel’s presentations at the Hannover Messe from 24 to 28 April 2017:
www.uni-kiel.de/hannovermesse

www.hannovermesse.de/aussteller/christian-albrechts-universitaet-zu-kiel

Kiel University’s booth can be found in Hall 2, C07
www.uni-kiel.de/hannovermesse/de/hallenplan

About Kiel Life Science:
The interdisciplinary centre for applied life sciences – Kiel Life Science (KLS) – links research at the CAU from the fields of agricultural and nutritional sciences, the natural sciences and medicine. It forms one of four research focus areas at Kiel University, and is aimed at achieving a better understanding of the cellular and molecular processes with which organisms respond to environmental influences. The research is focussed on issues such as how agricultural crop plants adapt to specific growth conditions, or how illnesses can arise through the interaction of genes, individual lifestyle and environmental factors. Health is always viewed holistically in the context of evolution. Under the research focus’ name, there are currently around 80 scientists from 40 institutes and six faculties from Kiel University working collaboratively as full members.

Photos/material is available for download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-118-1.jpg
Caption: A digital interactive presentation of KLS key research topics is part of the booth at the Hannover Messe.
Graphics: KLS, Kiel University

www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2017/2017-118-2.jpg
Caption: One of the exhibits at Hannover: The self-test „Perspective microbiome“ enables the diagnosis of micro-organisms in the human body.
Copyright: Yannick Kaiser/studioungleich.de

Contact:
Prof. Thomas Bosch
Zoological Institute, Kiel University
Tel.: 0431-880-4170
E-mail: tbosch@zoologie.uni-kiel.de

More information:
Research focus “Kiel Life Science”, Kiel University
www.kls.uni-kiel.de/en

Kiel Evolution Center, Kiel University
www.kec.uni-kiel.de

Cluster of Excellence "Inflammation at Interfaces":
inflammation-at-interfaces.de

Kiel University
Press, Communication and Marketing, Dr. Boris Pawlowski
Address: D-24098 Kiel, phone: +49 (0431) 880-2104, fax: +49 (0431) 880-1355
E-Mail: ► presse@uv.uni-kiel.de, Internet: ► www.uni-kiel.de
Twitter: ► www.twitter.com/kieluni, Facebook: ► www.facebook.com/kieluni, Instagram: ► www.instagram.com/kieluni
Text / Redaktion: ► Christian Urban

 

Kiel Life Science Award 2016

Jun 28, 2016

Call for Proposals

Kiel Life Science Award 2016 – 2 Postdoc-Awards

Awards will be rewarded in the categories:

  • Medicine
  • Non-medical Life Sciences

with Deadline 31st August 2016


Criteria:

  • Outstanding doctoral thesis
  • Research activities must be focused on medical or non-medical life sciences
  • Excellent individual quality: outstanding assessment of written work and of oral exam
  • Application max. 3 years after having obtained the doctoral degree (date of document is determinant)
  • Excellent quality of the proposal
  • Letter of recommendation from PI
  • Additional references to publication activity, age, interdisciplinary significance of doctoral thesis is required


Endowment: 6.000 EURO per award (5.000 EURO for science plus 1.000 EURO at own disposal)
The winners will be invited to give a talk at the KLS Retreat on 17/18 November 2016

Submit your proposals only per e-mail (in one pdf: max. of 5 pages, Arial 11pt; 1.5 space) to the KLS Scientific Office, Mrs. Sonja Petermann: spetermann@uv.uni-kiel.de

kiel-life-science-award-2016.jpg

CIFAR welcomes 35 new fellows

Jun 27, 2016

The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) unites leading scientists from various disciplines, to develop future solutions for global health, technological and environmental challenges. Over the last year CIFAR 35 new fellows and advisors have been appointed, now totaling close to 400 distinguished scientists and scholars, based at 129 leading institutions in 18 countries. Working collaboratively in 14 research programs, they are addressing some of the most important and complex questions facing our world today. Thomas Bosch, cell and developmental biologist and speaker to both the research focus “Kiel Life Science” and the Collaborative Research Center 1182 “Origin and Function of Metaorganisms” at Kiel University, joined this exclusive community including many of the world’s best scientific minds, as a “Senior Fellow” in 2016.

https://www.cifar.ca/profiles/thomas-bosch/

First international conference on metaorganism research in Kiel

Jun 09, 2016

2016-194-1.jpgCRC 1182 conference brings the world's leading experts on host bacteria relationships to Kiel University.

As of today, Wednesday 8 June, the international kick-off meeting of the Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1182 "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms" will take place at Kiel University – making it the first major scientific conference of the relatively new collaborative research project. Read more...

First international conference on metaorganism research in Kiel

Jun 09, 2016

CRC 1182 conference brings the world's leading experts on host bacteria relationships to Kiel University.

As of today, Wednesday 8 June, the international kick-off meeting of the Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1182 "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms" will take place at Kiel University – making it the first major scientific conference of the relatively new collaborative research project. Read more...

Thomas Bosch appointed to prestigious international institute of advanced study

May 23, 2016

x-sfb-1182-metaorganisms-ENKiel zoology professor becomes a Senior Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR)

It is comparable in importance with the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin (Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin), albeit on an international level: the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) unites leading scientists from various disciplines, to develop future solutions for global health, technological and environmental challenges. Read more...

Thomas Bosch appointed to prestigious international institute of advanced study

May 23, 2016

Kiel zoology professor becomes a Senior Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR)

It is comparable in importance with the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin (Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin), albeit on an international level: the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) unites leading scientists from various disciplines, to develop future solutions for global health, technological and environmental challenges. Around 350 researchers from 115 institutions in 17 different countries belong to this select group, which boasts no less than 18 Nobel prize winners since its founding. A few days ago, Professor Thomas Bosch, cell and developmental biologist at Kiel University (CAU) and speaker of the research focus “Kiel Life Science” and Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1182 “Origin and Function of Metaorganisms”, joined this community including many of the world’s best scientific minds, as a “Senior Fellow”.

The decision of the Canadian committee was based largely on Bosch's groundbreaking research on the relationships between life forms, micro organisms and the environment, and his attempts to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of these interactions. As such, he is a global pioneer in the new area of metaorganism research, which focusses on the examination of life forms and microbes as a functional unit. “Thomas Bosch's admission to this group featuring some of the most famous researchers in the world is not only a huge personal achievement, but also a great honour for Kiel University. As such, CIFAR has drawn on scientific expertise from among our ranks – a further confirmation that excellent research from Kiel has a place on the global stage,” said CAU Vice-President Professor Karin Schwarz, praising Bosch's nomination.

His research is centred around the question of how organisms and the microscopic life forms they host have developed into a multi-organism unit during the course of evolution. Bosch will now also pursue this revolutionary approach as part of the CIFAR research programme “Humans and the Microbiome.” It investigates the mutual influences exerted on each other by the human body and its bacterial colonies. The long-term goal is the development of improved treatments for a broad spectrum of major illnesses, all of which are caused by a disrupted relationship between body and bacteria. In Kiel, this new area of research features particularly in Collaborative Research Centre (Sonderforschungsbereich or SFB) 1182 “Origin and Function of Metaorganisms”, of which Bosch is also the chairperson.

About the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR):
Since its founding in 1982, CIFAR has brought together leading international scientists, forming interdisciplinary research teams to take on the toughest scientific challenges facing humanity. Currently, there are 14 interdisciplinary research projects, focussing on areas such as life sciences and social and technological issues. The CIFAR research teams share a total annual budget equivalent to around 11 million Euro.

Photos/material is available for download:
Please pay attention to our ► Hinweise zur Verwendung

  

Click to enlarge

Thomas Bosch, Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology at Kiel University, was appointed as a CIFAR “Senior Fellow” in spring.
Photo: Dr. Tebke Böschen, Kiel University

Image to download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2016/2016-158-1.jpg

 

Contact:

 

Prof. Thomas Bosch
Zoologisches Institut, CAU Kiel
Tel.: 0431-880-4170
E-Mail: tbosch@zoologie.uni-kiel.de

 

 

More information:

 

Cell and Developmental Biology, Prof. Bosch, Kiel University:
www.bosch.zoologie.uni-kiel.de

 

Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR):
www.cifar.ca

 

Forschungsschwerpunkt „Kiel Life Science“, Kiel University:
www.kls.uni-kiel.de/

 

 

Collaborative Research Centre 1182 „Origin and Function of Metaorganisms", Kiel University:
www.metaorganism-research.com

  

Kiel University
Press, Communication and Marketing, Dr. Boris Pawlowski
Address: D-24098 Kiel, phone: +49 (0431) 880-2104, fax: +49 (0431) 880-1355
E-Mail: ► presse@uv.uni-kiel.de, Internet: ► www.uni-kiel.de
Twitter: ► www.twitter.com/kieluni, Facebook: ► www.facebook.com/kieluni
Text / Redaktion: Christian Urban

Rapid adaptation to a changing environment

Apr 28, 2016

Together with two international colleagues, Kiel-based biologist receives 900,000 euros for research

Kiel-based biologist Dr. Sebastian Fraune from Kiel University's Cell and Developmental Biology working group has recently succeeded in gaining significant individual funding: out of around 200 applications, his new research project, together with six other projects, claimed this year's funding awarded by the international "Human Frontier Science Program" (HFSP). Together with a US-American and an Australian colleague, Fraune will now be working on the question of how living things are able to quickly adapt to changed environmental conditions influenced by climate change. Over the next three years, the equivalent of 900,000 euros of HFSP funds will now be available to the Kiel-based biologist as well as Dr. Adam Reitzel from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Dr. Sylvain Foret from the Australian National University in Canberra for this research work. Read more...

Rapid adaptation to a changing environment

Apr 28, 2016

Together with two international colleagues, Kiel-based biologist receives 900,000 euros for research

Kiel-based biologist Dr. Sebastian Fraune from Kiel University's Cell and Developmental Biology working group has recently succeeded in gaining significant individual funding: out of around 200 applications, his new research project, together with six other projects, claimed this year's funding awarded by the international "Human Frontier Science Program" (HFSP). Together with a US-American and an Australian colleague, Fraune will now be working on the question of how living things are able to quickly adapt to changed environmental conditions influenced by climate change. Over the next three years, the equivalent of 900,000 euros of HFSP funds will now be available to the Kiel-based biologist as well as Dr. Adam Reitzel from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Dr. Sylvain Foret from the Australian National University in Canberra for this research work. Read more...

Seminar: LC-MS based protein analytics, proteomics and bioanalytics

Apr 15, 2016 from 02:00 PM to 04:00 PM

Hörsaal 1, Innere Medizin, UKSH

New Leibniz Campus for Researching Lung Diseases Approved

Mar 18, 2016

- Joint Press Release -

What a week! The Leibniz Association has announced the establishment of three ScienceCampi in the university city of Kiel. This was decided by the Senate of the Leibniz Association in Berlin yesterday (Thursday 17 March). The three include the new evolutionary medicine centre “Evolutionary Medicine of the Lung” (EvoLUNG). As the first institute of its kind in Germany, EvoLUNG will receive subsidies of around 4 million Euros over the next four years (2016 to 2020). The state of Schleswig-Holstein will contribute half a million Euros to the project, which is being run by the Research Center Borstel (FZB), Kiel University (CAU) and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön (MPI-EB). Read more...

New Leibniz Campus for Researching Lung Diseases Approved

Mar 18, 2016

- Joint Press Release -

What a week! The Leibniz Association has announced the establishment of three ScienceCampi in the university city of Kiel. This was decided by the Senate of the Leibniz Association in Berlin yesterday (Thursday 17 March). The three include the new evolutionary medicine centre “Evolutionary Medicine of the Lung” (EvoLUNG). As the first institute of its kind in Germany, EvoLUNG will receive subsidies of around 4 million Euros over the next four years (2016 to 2020). The state of Schleswig-Holstein will contribute half a million Euros to the project, which is being run by the Research Center Borstel (FZB), Kiel University (CAU) and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön (MPI-EB).

The goals of the new ScienceCampus EvoLUNG are the interdisciplinary research of serious lung diseases based on evolutionary scientific methods, and potentially the development of new therapies for diseases such as asthma, tuberculosis, cystic fibrosis or chronic bronchitis. In this new initiative, the leading biomedical research institutes state-wide are coming together, to create an unparalleled interdisciplinary research environment in evolutionary medicine. “EvoLUNG is another excellent example of the top-level interdisciplinary research in the north – and the cooperation between various research institutes. The decision of the Leibniz Association is a major milestone for Schleswig-Holstein as a science location,” said Minister of Science Kristin Alheit.

The scientific tasks for EvoLUNG cover three core topics: the first research area looks at the origin and spread of treatment-resistant pathogens in the lungs. The second research area focusses on the evolution of disease-causing genes in humans, especially those genes that give an advantage to lung diseases. The third research area investigates the interaction between disease-causing genes, microorganisms, pathogens and the environment as factors in disease development in the lungs.

“In spite of major progress in diagnosis and treatment, lung diseases are still spreading globally, and are a leading cause of death. With the interdisciplinary research of the underlying evolutionary mechanisms of disease development, we are opening up a completely new perspective on how to combat these urgent medical and societal challenges,” said Professor Stefan Ehlers, CEO of the Research Center Borstel of the Leibniz Association, about the importance of the new initiative.


With the establishment of the evolutionary medicine research centre EvoLUNG, unique in Germany, the project partners FZB, CAU and MPI-EB are achieving pioneering work in the science location Schleswig-Holstein. The potential of the new centre lies especially in teamwork/networking of the institutes involved. “The locations of Borstel, Plön and the CAU have achieved significant research successes in the areas of evolutionary theory, experimental evolution and evolutionary genomics”, explained FZB Professor Stefan Niemann, spokesperson of the new Campus. In addition, they have specialist knowledge of the functional analysis of disease-causing genes, of researching the interaction between host and pathogens, and of chronically inflammatory lung diseases, especially tuberculosis and asthma. In the EvoLUNG project they can combine these strengths to make decisive advances in researching serious lung diseases.

“The EvoLUNG centre makes it possible, for the first time, to research a whole spectrum of lung diseases from a fundamentally evolutionary perspective,” emphasised Professor Tal Dagan from the CAU. Professor Hinrich Schulenburg, also from the CAU, said: “With the help of evolutionary medicine, we want to gain a new understanding of lung diseases, in order to identify new treatment approaches in future.” John Baines, Professor at the Max Planck Institute in Plön, added: “A great strength of this research alliance lies in the balance between researching the causes of diseases and expertise in evolutionary theory. We at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology can make a contribution by examining the model organisms generally used in biomedical research from a unique evolutionary perspective.”

Contact:
Prof. Stefan Niemann
Molecular and Experimental Mycobacteriology, FZB
Tel.: +49 (0)4537 - 188 - 7620
Email: sniemann@fz-borstel.de

Prof. Hinrich Schulenburg
Department of Evolutionary Ecology and Genetics,
Zoological Institute, Kiel University
Tel: +49 (0) 431-880-4141
Email: hschulenburg@zoologie.uni-kiel.de


Kiel University
Press, Communication and Marketing, Dr. Boris Pawlowski
Address: D-24098 Kiel, phone: +49 (0431) 880-2104, fax: +49 (0431) 880-1355
E-Mail: ► presse@uv.uni-kiel.de, Internet: ► www.uni-kiel.de
Twitter: ► www.twitter.com/kieluni, Facebook: ► www.facebook.com/kieluni

Research Center Borstel - Leibniz-Center for Medicine and Biosciences
Dr Bettina Brand, Scientific Officer
Postal address: Parkallee 1-40, 23845 Borstel
Tel.: +49 (0)4537 188 – 4390 Fax: +49 (0)4537 188 - 4060
E-Mail: ► bbrand@fz-borstel.de, Internet: ► www.fz-borstel.de

Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Biology
Press and Public Relations, Dr Kerstin Mehnert
Postal address: August-Thienemann-Straße 2, 24306 Plön
Tel.: +49 (0)4522 763-233, Fax: +49 (0)4522 763-351
E-Mail: ► mehnert@evolbio.mpg.de, Internet: ► www.evolbio.mpg.de

Text / Redaktion: Christian Urban

15 PhD positions available at IMPRS

Mar 14, 2016

 

The International Max Planck Research School for Evolutionary Biology (IMPRS) is offering up to 15 PhD positions and fellowships. Please check out the vacancy notice. The deadline for applications is April 17, 2016.

To obtain further information about our PhD program and application details (only online application possible), please visit the IMPRS-website.

 

15 PhD positions available at IMPRS

Mar 14, 2016

 

The International Max Planck Research School for Evolutionary Biology (IMPRS) is offering up to 15 PhD positions and fellowships. Please check out the vacancy notice. The deadline for applications is April 17, 2016.

To obtain further information about our PhD program and application details (only online application possible), please visit the IMPRS-website.

 

Prof. Peter C. Kjærgaard visited the Zoological Museum of Kiel University

Feb 05, 2016

On February 4th Peter C. Kjærgaard, the new director of the Natural History Museum of Denmark at the University of Copenhagen, visited the Zoological Museum of Kiel University to finalize the repatriation process of the Kiel Fabricius collection. Peter Kjærgaard was accompanied by Nikolaj Scharff, head of Collections, Professor and Curator at the Natural History Museum of Denmark. The Zoological Museum of Kiel University (CAU) lent its Fabricius collection to the Natural History Museum of Denmark in 1958, where the collection still remains today. In discussions with Dirk Brandis, Michael Kuhlmann and Thomas Bosch, an agreement was reached that a part of the collection of Fabricius exhibits will be transferred back to Kiel along with part of the Danish Sehested Tønder Lund collection. The return of the entire Kiel Fabricius collection in its original composition is not practical from a scientific standpoint. The main problem would be the separation of type series, which would render scientific access to the types significantly more difficult. The Zoological Museum of Kiel University and the Natural History Museum of Denmark at the University of Copenhagen plan a close cooperation in the future preparation, acquisition and management of the two Fabricius collections.

New Collaborative Research Centre "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms" approved at Kiel University

Nov 24, 2015

The DFG (German Research Foundation) is providing 10 million Euros to support research into the interaction between organisms and microbial symbionts

Kiel University is currently setting the path for its future research and can celebrate another success along the way: based on the convincing assessment from the summer this year, the DFG decided today (Thursday, 19 November) to support the new Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1182 "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms". This means that over four years, around 10 million Euros are available for the researchers, who come from eight institutions involved in the joint project. Read more...

New Collaborative Research Centre "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms" approved at Kiel University

Nov 24, 2015

The DFG (German Research Foundation) is providing 10 million Euros to support research into the interaction between organisms and microbial symbionts

Kiel University is currently setting the path for its future research and can celebrate another success along the way: based on the convincing assessment from the summer this year, the DFG decided today (Thursday, 19 November) to support the new Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1182 "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms". This means that over four years, around 10 million Euros are available for the researchers, who come from eight institutions involved in the joint project.

For Professor Lutz Kipp, President of Kiel University, the approval of this grant brings an additional supporting pillar for life sciences in the north. "On behalf of the entire University Board, I would like to congratulate all those involved in the CRC! The competition was extremely strong. In the end, an ambitious project from Kiel made it. With this positive assessment, the DFG also recognises the excellent work that we have been producing here over the years. This greatly helps us maintain an international level in research and innovation", Professor Lutz Kipp, President of Kiel University, said about the decision by Germany's most significant scientific funding organisation.

The scientists from five institutes at Kiel University, from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and from the Max Planck Institutes for Evolutionary Biology and Marine Microbiology in Plön and Bremen were able to convince the DFG with their very interdisciplinary research concept. Together, they have now formed the CRC 1182 and are working on the issue of how plants and animals, including humans, form functional units (metaorganisms) together with highly specific microbial communities. The aim of the CRC is to understand why and how microbial communities enter into these long lasting connections with their hosts, and what functional consequences these interactions have.

"We want to understand how an organism and the microbes that colonize it form a functional unit - the metaorganism. The interactions in these multi-member communities have evolutionary and ecological effects that influence the lifecycles and fitness of all living creatures. The metaorganism therefore plays an important role in the balance between health and disease", said CRC 1182 spokesman, Professor Thomas Bosch, to describe the joint project's research approach.

The CRC "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms" covers 13 sub-projects and the three main topics of "Evolution and Ecology", "Recognition and Communication" and "Function and Life History". The research projects are pooled together under these topics. In addition, the CRC also contains infrastructural sub-projects which provide indispensable services such as data management, bioinformatics or the latest sequencing technology. With the positive funding decision, the new Collaborative Research Centre also benefited from structures in these fields which had been successfully established in Kiel over the last few years.

Photos/material is available for download:
Please pay attention to our ► Hinweise zur Verwendung

Click to enlarge

In addition to humans, the researchers also investigated model organisms such as the freshwater polyps, Hydra, in order to better understand the interaction between micro-organisms and multi-cellular living beings.
Photo: Thomas Bosch

Image to download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2015/2015-429-1.jpg

Click to enlarge

CRC 1182 spokesman Professor Thomas Bosch (centre) and his deputy Professor Hinrich Schulenburg (right) presented the research concept for the joint project to the DFG commission.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

Image to download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2015/2015-429-2.jpg

Click to enlarge

Researchers from Kiel, along with their cooperation partners, were very convincing during the DFG assessment procedure, which lasted several months.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

Image to download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2015/2015-429-3.jpg

Click to enlarge

Logo for the Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1182 "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms"

Image to download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2015/2015-429-4.jpg


Contact:
Prof. Thomas Bosch
Zoological Institute, Kiel University
Tel.: 0049 (0)431-880-4170
E-Mail: tbosch@zoologie.uni-kiel.de

Kiel University
Press, Communication and Marketing, Dr. Boris Pawlowski
Address: D-24098 Kiel, phone: +49 (0431) 880-2104, fax: +49 (0431) 880-1355
E-Mail: ► presse@uv.uni-kiel.de, Internet: ► www.uni-kiel.de, Jubiläum: ► www.uni-kiel.de/cau350
Twitter: ► www.twitter.com/kieluni, Facebook: ► www.facebook.com/kieluni
Text / Redaktion: Christian Urban

Alternative concepts in cancer research

Nov 06, 2015

Robert Gatenby from the Moffitt Cancer Center visited Kiel University

Robert A. Gatenby, M.D., American cancer research expert, Chairman of the Department of Radiology and Co-Director of the Cancer Biology and Evolution Program at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, recently visited Kiel University upon invitation by the research focus "Kiel Life Science". In addition to exchanging ideas with numerous researchers at Kiel University, the internationally renowned scientist also gave a public presentation on "Cancer & Evolution" to more than 100 listeners in the evening of 5 November, during which he argued his provocative yet, at the same time, revolutionary perspective of cancer. In the search for new treatments, Gatenby unites theoretical evolutionary biology with tumour biology and clinical oncology. This combination should result in a new view of cancer as a dynamic, evolutionary system. “Despite the critical role of evolution in therapy failure, evolution dynamics virtually never enter clinical design”, Gatenby commented. Read more...

Alternative concepts in cancer research

Nov 06, 2015

Robert Gatenby from the Moffitt Cancer Center visited Kiel University

Robert A. Gatenby, M.D., American cancer research expert, Chairman of the Department of Radiology and Co-Director of the Cancer Biology and Evolution Program at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, recently visited Kiel University upon invitation by the research focus "Kiel Life Science". In addition to exchanging ideas with numerous researchers at Kiel University, the internationally renowned scientist also gave a public presentation on "Cancer & Evolution" to more than 100 listeners in the evening of 5 November, during which he argued his provocative yet, at the same time, revolutionary perspective of cancer. In the search for new treatments, Gatenby unites theoretical evolutionary biology with tumour biology and clinical oncology. This combination should result in a new view of cancer as a dynamic, evolutionary system. “Despite the critical role of evolution in therapy failure, evolution dynamics virtually never enter clinical design”, Gatenby commented.

On this basis, Gatenby has developed new approaches to therapy that do not aim to completely eliminate the cancer, but which permit the organism to 'tame' or tolerate it. This way, aggressive forms of cancer can be reduced and those affected can live longer - but still with cancer.

Gatenby's cancer research reflects current debate within medicine and evolutionary research which places emphasis on the evolution of the disease and the pathogen when developing treatments. This approach is being extensively discussed in science, in particular for the development of alternative treatments of infectious diseases in the face of the growing antibiotics crisis.

In everyday medical life, and especially from the patients' perspective, this approach represents a major paradigm shift, as the outlook for those affected is then no longer a cure, i.e. complete removal of disease and pathogen, but a longer-lasting or permanent tolerance of the illness. Gatenby's presentation brought this year's KLS series of lectures focussing on "Evolutionary Medicine" to an end. In 2016 the lecture series will continue with new focus areas.

Photos/material is available for download:
Please pay attention to our ► Hinweise zur Verwendung

Click to enlarge

Robert Gatenby talked about his of view of cancer as a dynamic, evolutionary system.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

Image to download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2015/2015-401-1.jpg

Click to enlarge

Prof. Hinrich Schulenburg welcomed Gatenby on behalf of the research focus “Kiel Life Science” to Kiel University.
Photo: Dr. Tebke Böschen, Universität Kiel

Image to download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2015/2015-401-2.jpg

Click to enlarge

Among an audience of over 100 in CAU’s Audimax, numerous Kiel based researchers from medical and evolutionary sciences attended Gatenby’s talk.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

Image to download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2015/2015-401-3.jpg

 

More information:

 

Integrated Mathematical Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center:

labpages.moffitt.org/imo/

 

 

Research focus "Kiel Life Science“, Kiel University:

www.kls.uni-kiel.de/

 

 

Kiel University

Press, Communication and Marketing, Dr. Boris Pawlowski

Address: D-24098 Kiel, phone: +49 (0431) 880-2104, fax: +49 (0431) 880-1355

E-Mail: ► presse@uv.uni-kiel.de, Internet: ► www.uni-kiel.de, Jubiläum: ► www.uni-kiel.de/cau350

 

Twitter: ► www.twitter.com/kieluni, Facebook: ► www.facebook.com/kieluni

 

Text / Redaktion: Christian Urban

Annual Conference of the German Genetics Society

Sep 28, 2015 12:00 PM to Sep 30, 2015 04:00 PM

Audimax

Genome research for environmentally-friendly plant protection

Aug 28, 2015

2015-290-1

International workshop "Evolutionary Genomics of Plant Pathogens" at Kiel University

 
Since yesterday, Wednesday 26 August, until Friday 28 August, the "Environmental Genomics" working group at the Botanical Institute at Kiel University, led by Professor Eva Stukenbrock, is holding the international workshop "Evolutionary Genomics of Plant Pathogens". Around 50 experts from roughly 20 international universities and research institutes are coming together at the Centre for Molecular Biosciences Kiel (ZMB) to discuss the current state of knowledge in the genomics of plant pathogens, as regards the whole genetic information of plant pests. The workshop in Kiel is part of a Europe-wide initiative which aims to reduce the use of pesticides in agriculture by scientifically developing environmentally-friendly plant protection. Read more...

Genome research for environmentally-friendly plant protection

Aug 28, 2015

International workshop "Evolutionary Genomics of Plant Pathogens" at Kiel University

Since yesterday, Wednesday 26 August, until Friday 28 August, the "Environmental Genomics" working group at the Botanical Institute at Kiel University, led by Professor Eva Stukenbrock, is holding the international workshop "Evolutionary Genomics of Plant Pathogens". Around 50 experts from roughly 20 international universities and research institutes are coming together at the Centre for Molecular Biosciences Kiel (ZMB) to discuss the current state of knowledge in the genomics of plant pathogens, as regards the whole genetic information of plant pests. The workshop in Kiel is part of a Europe-wide initiative which aims to reduce the use of pesticides in agriculture by scientifically developing environmentally-friendly plant protection.

The initiative, called COST Sustain, is financed by the EU programme COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) for promoting Europe-wide research cooperation. The interdisciplinary workshop will focus on such issues as which genes are responsible for how harmful plant pathogens are, how this harmfulness prevails under high selection pressure, or which genetic mechanisms are responsible for fast adaptation of pests to changing environmental conditions.

"Recently, knowledge about the evolutionary interaction of crops and their pests has become more comprehensive. Decrypting the genetic bases of these mutual adaptations is fundamental for effective, natural plant protection. An important tool for this is the ever increasing and more accessible data volume on plant pest genomes. Bit by bit, our research is working towards farming ensuring food security without extensive pesticide use", says Professor Stukenbrock, member of the research focus "Kiel Life Science" (KLS) at Kiel University, about the significance of the workshop and the research area.

In order to get a little nearer to the goal of sustainable plant protection, researchers from various disciplines are trying to use the natural resistance of plants against their pests. Against this, above all, is the ability of plant pathogens to overcome the plant's protective mechanisms using fast evolutionary adaptations. Current advances in genome sequencing and analysis enable science to increasingly understand the evolution of plant pathogens, and thus identify promising approaches for environmentally-friendly plant protection.

Photos/material is available for download:
Please pay attention to our ► Hinweise zur Verwendung

Click to enlarge

Some of the people behind the COST Sustain-workshop at Kiel University: Dr. Thomas Kroj, project coordinator, Prof. Eva Stukenbrock und Michael Habig, local organizers and main speaker Prof. Sophien Kamoun of the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich (UK).
Foto: Christian Urban, Universität Kiel

Image to download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2015/2015-290-1.jpg

Click to enlarge

Prof. Eva Stukenbrock welcomes her international colleagues on behalf of Kiel University to the workshop in Kiel.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

Image to download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2015/2015-290-2.jpg

Click to enlarge

Prof. Thomas Bataillon of Aarhus University in Denmark kicks off the scientific programme.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

Image to download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2015/2015-290-3.jpg

Click to enlarge

Dr. Thomas Kroj of INRA Montpellier is a coordinator with the European COST Sustain-project for sustainable plant protection.
Photo: Christian Urban, Kiel University

Image to download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2015/2015-290-4.jpg

Click to enlarge

About 50 international experts attend the „Evolutionary genomics of plant pathogens“-workshop at Kiel University. Foto: Christian Urban, Universität Kiel

Image to download:
www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2015/2015-290-5.jpg

 

Key facts:

 

What: International workshop "Evolutionary Genomics of Plant Pathogens"

 

When: Wednesday 26 August to Friday 28 August 2015

 

Where: Centre for Molecular Biosciences Kiel (ZMB),

Am Botanischen Garten 11, 24118 Kiel

 

 

Contact:

 

Prof. Eva Stukenbrock

Working Group „Environmental Genomics“

Botanical Institute, Kiel University

Tel.: +49 (0)431/-880-6366

E-Mail: estukenbrock@bot.uni-kiel.de

e

 

More information:

 

Event website "Evolutionary Genomics of Plant Pathogens":

http://www.cost-sustain.org/Events-and-meetings/Workshop-Evolutionary-genomics-of-plant-pathogens

 

 

Working group "Environmental Genomics":

https://www.envgenomics.botanik.uni-kiel.de/

 

 

Research focus "Kiel Life Science" (KLS)

http://www.kls.uni-kiel.de/en?set_language=en

 

 

EU programme COST Sustain:

http://www.cost-sustain.org/About-Sustain

 

 

Media representatives who wish to report on the international workshop "Evolutionary Genomics of Plant Pathogens" in Kiel are very welcome. The event is taking place as part of the research focus "Kiel Life Science" (KLS) at Kiel University, which connects research from agricultural and nutritional sciences, natural sciences and medicine.

 

 

Kiel University

Press, Communication and Marketing, Dr. Boris Pawlowski

Address: D-24098 Kiel, phone: +49 (0431) 880-2104, fax: +49 (0431) 880-1355

E-Mail: ► presse@uv.uni-kiel.de, Internet: ► www.uni-kiel.de, Jubiläum: ► www.uni-kiel.de/cau350

 

Twitter: ► www.twitter.com/kieluni, Facebook: ► www.facebook.com/kieluni

 

Text / Redaktion: Christian Urban

Workshop „Evolutionary Genomics of Plant Pathogens“

Aug 26, 2015 09:00 AM to Aug 28, 2015 12:30 PM

Centre for Molecular Biosciences Kiel (ZMB)

Nematode worms hitch a ride on slugs

Jul 13, 2015

2015-263-1.jpgKiel scientists expand the understanding of Caenorhabditis elegans’ natural ecology


Slugs and other invertebrates provide essential public transport for small worms including Caenorhabditis elegans in the search for food, as researchers from Kiel University have now found out. These worms are around a millimeter long and commonly found in short-lived environments, such as decomposing fruit or other rotting plant material. Read more...

Recent views on Evolution and Cancer

Jun 19, 2015

Joint scientific workshop by the Kiel Oncology Network and Kiel Life Science

The recently founded Kiel Oncology Network (KON) together with the research focus Kiel Life Science (KLS) at Kiel University organized an internal workshop on “Evolution & Cancer” on June 16 and 17. The event started Tuesday night with a keynote lecture on the evolution of cancer and the role of stem cells by Professor Christoph Röcken of the Institute of Pathology. Read more...

Recent views on Evolution and Cancer

Jun 19, 2015

Joint scientific workshop by the Kiel Oncology Network and Kiel Life Science

The recently founded Kiel Oncology Network (KON) together with the research focus Kiel Life Science (KLS) at Kiel University organized an internal workshop on “Evolution & Cancer” on June 16 and 17. The event started Tuesday night with a keynote lecture on the evolution of cancer and the role of stem cells by Professor Christoph Röcken of the Institute of Pathology.

After a welcome on Wednesday morning by Kiel Life Science spokesman Professor Thomas Bosch of the Institute of Zoology, the comprehensive scientific program covered a range of topics like pathogenesis of tumors, evolutionary aspects and therapeutic implications. The event took place at the Zoological Museum of Kiel University with its special setting of 19th century architecture by Martin Gropius. The stage was set here for numerous high profile contributions from within Kiel Life Science, often triggering intense discussion between the roughly 50 attending fellow Kiel life scientists.

The different talks mirrored the interdisciplinary approach within cancer research in Kiel, looking upon the issue from for example medical, biological or mathematical points of view. To name just a few of the numerous excellent talks, contributions were made for example by: Professor Susanne Sebens of the Institute of Experimental Medicine and co-founder of the Kiel Oncology Network, who delivered insights into the mechanisms of drug resistance in cancer therapy or Professor Hinrich Schulenburg of the Department of Evolutionary Ecology and Genetics, who gave an overview of major evolutionary principles and how they apply to cancer research. Professor John Baines of the Institute of Experimental Medicine and the Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology Plön highlighted the role of intestinal microbiota in the evolution of cancer.

The workshop helped to raise awareness for the different fields of cancer research and their strong linkage to evolutionary science within KLS and also opened new perspectives for future cooperation in this field. Following the KLS public lecture also on evolution earlier this week, the internal “Evolution & Cancer” workshop thus formed another highlight among the various activities and events that together will help to strengthen KLS’s profile as a major location in life science research, both nationally and internationally.

President of Estonia visits Kiel University

May 20, 2015

Another official visit in Kiel: precisely one week after Kiel University had the honour of welcoming the Israeli President Reuvin Rivlin, his Estonian counterpart, President Toomas Hendrik Ilves, visited the capital city of Schleswig-Holstein today (Wednesday, 20 May). He was accompanied, among others, by the Estonian Ambassador in Germany, Kaja Tael. The official visit, upon invitation by Federal President Joachim Gauck, was completely focussed on science. In addition to the official reception by Minister President, Torsten Albig, the visits to Kiel University and the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel formed the central point of the time spent in Kiel. Read more...

President of Estonia visits Centre for Molecular Biosciences (ZMB)

May 20, 2015

Another official visit in Kiel: precisely one week after Kiel University had the honour of welcoming the Israeli President Reuvin Rivlin, his Estonian counterpart, President Toomas Hendrik Ilves, visited the capital city of Schleswig-Holstein. He was accompanied, among others, by the Estonian Ambassador in Germany, Kaja Tael. The official visit, upon invitation by Federal President Joachim Gauck, was completely focussed on science, President Ilves’ visits to Kiel University took place at the Centre for Molecular Biosciences (ZMB).

University President Professor Lutz Kipp welcomed the official guest. On behalf of “Kiel Life Science”, Professor Thomas Bosch and Professor Philipp Rosenstiel informed President Ilves of the content and possibilities of the research in Life Sciences in Kiel via a presentation and a tour of the lab. “We as Life Scientists from Kiel look forward to a productive exchange with our Estonian colleagues", emphasized Bosch, spokesperson for the Kiel research focus "Kiel Life Science" and deputy managing director of the ZMB.

President Ilves and his delegation exchanged views with representatives of the university about the possibilities for strengthening German-Estonian university cooperation. The Estonian delegation was especially interested in an exchange in the field of Natural and Life Sciences, which has a particularly strong position at Kiel University with its interdisciplinary centre "Kiel Life Science". President Toomas Ilves corroborated the good relations between the Estonian universities and Kiel University: "Research in Natural Sciences and Life Sciences will be of increasing importance in scientific competition in the future. This also applies for our universities in Estonia. Thus, we greatly appreciate Kiel University as a strong partner and we are seeking to intensify scientific cooperation in this field.”

DFG reviews “Origin and Function of Metaorganisms”

May 21, 2015

The German Science Foundation’s (DFG) reviewing process of the funding proposal for the new Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) „Origin and Function of Metaorganisms” at Kiel University is entering its crucial phase: On July 6 and 7, the DFG-panel visits Kiel for its two-day review process. This peer review panel draws up funding recommendations on the Collaborative Research Centre as a whole that are presented to the responsible Grants Committee for decision making. The final funding decision is made during the second meeting of the DFG’s Grants Committee at the end of this year, which hopefully turns out to be favourable. Read more...

DFG reviews “Origin and Function of Metaorganisms”

May 21, 2015

The German Science Foundation’s (DFG) reviewing process of the funding proposal for the new Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) „Origin and Function of Metaorganisms” at Kiel University is entering its crucial phase: On July 6 and 7, the DFG-panel visits Kiel for its two-day review process. This peer review panel draws up funding recommendations on the Collaborative Research Centre as a whole that are presented to the responsible Grants Committee for decision making. The final funding decision is made during the second meeting of the DFG’s Grants Committee at the end of this year, which hopefully turns out to be favourable.

Led by Professor Thomas Bosch from the Zoological Institute, 26 colleagues from the Faculties of Medicine and Mathematics and Natural Sciences and from the central administration of Kiel University collaborated in writing the funding proposal. Additional support came from colleagues of the Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön, the Max-Planck-Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and from the University of Hamburg.

The following abstract is taken from the proposal:

Origin and Function of Metaorganisms
From protists to humans, all animals and plants are inhabited by microbial organisms. There is an increasing appreciation that these resident microbes influence fitness of their plant and animal hosts, ultimately forming a metaorganism consisting of a uni- or multicellular host and a community of associated microorganisms. Research on host-microbe interactions has become an emerging cross-disciplinary field. In both vertebrates as well as invertebrates a complex microbiome confers immunological, metabolic and behavioural benefits; its disturbance can contribute to the development of disease states. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling interactions within the metaorganisms are poorly understood and many key interactions between the associated organisms remain unknown. The ultimate goal of the Collaborative Research Center is to understand why and how microbial communities form long-term associations with hosts from diverse taxonomic groups. We are particularly interested in the specific functional consequences of the interactions, the underlying regulatory principles, and also the resulting impact on host life history and evolutionary fitness in selected host systems.

Current trends in nutrition research

May 12, 2015

Karin Schwarz
 

International Symposium "Food-Nutrition-Health" at the University of Kiel

On Tuesday, 12 May and Wednesday, 13 May, the Institute for Human Nutrition and Food Science hosted the international symposium "Food-Nutrition-Health" within the framework of the 350th anniversary of the Christian Albrecht University of Kiel (CAU). Around 120 experts from nutrition research, food sciences and medicine from around 20 institutions took part. They exchanged information on current developments in areas such as biofunctionality, technological characteristics and preventive health measures in food and nutrition. "Since 2004 the symposium has proved itself as a format for scientific exchange and dialogue with representatives of commerce," said Professor Karin Schwarz, CAU vice-president and director of the Department of Food Technology, emphasizing the significance of the event. Read more...

Professor Sophien Kamoun talks at MPI for Evolutionary Biology

Apr 21, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 01:00 PM

Max-Planck-Institut für Evolutionsbiologie in Plön

Events

Application Deadline for IMPRS PhD-Positions

Apr 19, 2015

Application Deadline for IMPRS PhD-Positions

Apr 19, 2015

Lecture series: A Functional Perspective on Bacterial Individuality

Jun 15, 2015 from 03:00 PM to 06:00 PM

Audimax, lecture hall D

Lecture series: A Functional Perspective on Bacterial Individuality

Jun 15, 2015 from 03:00 PM to 06:00 PM

Audimax, lecture hall D

Lecture series

The lecture series format began on April, 16th 2014. The lectures by scientists from the life sciences are aimed at interested parties from all areas of the university. After the lectures, an informal get-together provides an opportunity for exchange.

Lectures in 2014

Lectures in 2015

Current Research

News

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